JAPAN Parliamentary Poll: Abe Shinzo Along With Party Wins Decisively

October 23rd, 2017 | by Sukumar Roy
JAPAN Parliamentary Poll: Abe Shinzo Along With Party Wins Decisively
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PRIME Minister Narendra Modi has complimented  his Japanese counterpart  Shinzo Abe for his massive win in the general election with his Liberal Democratic Party along with coalition partner  Komeito  winning  at least 312 seats in the 465-member House. Japan recorded 54 per cent voter turnout yesterday despite Typhoon Lan affecting normal life across the ancient country. The term of the lower house was scheduled to come to an end in December 2018.After his re-election in a snap poll, he is expected to remain in the saddle for another four years to become the longest ever serving PM of his motherland.

“I think the results reflected the voters’ preference for a solid political foundation and their expectations for us to push polices forward and achieve results,” Abe said following the election result, reported AP. “I will humbly face the victory and continue to work humbly and sincerely,” he added. Results of four seats are expected on Monday .Soon after coming back from India, where  he  laid the foundation stone  for India’s first-ever bullet train  with PM Modi ,Abe  had stunned the nation and political parties by  dissolving the lower house and calling for snap polls earlier this year  to extend his premiership for another three years till 2021. He told the Lower House in September, he was seeking public mandate on his policies. The four-year term of the House was to otherwise end in December 2018.

 Abe’s call for snap polls and dissolution of the House also delayed intervention from Opposition members regarding allegations of government favouritism in awarding contracts. Abe’s support ratings had dropped at least 30 per cent last summer following the allegations.CNN says the win likely means a continuation of the policies Abe has pursued since he took office in December 2012 — a hard line on North Korea, close ties with Washington, including defense, as well as a super-loose monetary policy and push for nuclear energy. Stocks rose in Tokyo on Monday morning.”

Abe’s ruling coalition already has a two-thirds majority in the less powerful upper house. Having a so-called supermajority in both houses gives them virtually a free hand to push even divisive policies and legislation. Abe said the results indicate that voters support his policies and want to see his political leadership continue.”I think the results reflected the voters’ preference for a solid political foundation and their expectations for us to push polices forward and achieve results,” Abe told NHK.

The massive win will help Abe bounce his acceptance among the voters.In summer, his support ratings plunged to 30 percent after accusations of government favouritism to people connected to him. For the first time since he took office nearly five years ago, he appeared vulnerable as both party leader and prime minister.

The ruling coalition’s victory, though, reflects as much the lack of viable alternatives as support for Abe, a fact that he seemed to acknowledge in post-election comments. Turnout was just 54 percent, as typhoon rains lashed much of the country, says ABC.

“I will humbly face the victory and continue to work humbly and sincerely,” he told NHK, noting lingering public distrust over the scandals. His plan was briefly upstaged by the launch of a new opposition party by populist Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike. But initial excitement faded, and the Party of Hope took only 49 seats.

Another new party, the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, won 54 seats and looks to be the biggest opposition grouping. It is liberal-leaning, while both the Party of Hope and Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party are considered more conservative.Koike called the results “very severe” in a televised interview from Paris, where she is attending a conference of mayors. She said some of her remarks might have been taken negatively by voters, and that she would take the blame. Abe’s party and its nationalist supporters have advocated constitutional revisions for years. They view the 1947 constitution as the legacy of Japan’s defeat in World War II and an imposition of the victor’s world order and values. The charter renounces the use of force in international conflicts and limits Japan’s troops to self-defense, although Japan has a well-equipped modern military that works closely with the U.S.

 

 

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